NCsoft

NCsoft, stylized as NCSOFT, is a South Korea-based online, video and mobile game development company that has produced Lineage, City of Heroes, WildStar, Guild Wars, Aion, Blade & Soul, and Master X Master.

NCsoft was founded in March 1997 by T.J. Kim. In September 1998, NCsoft launched its first game Lineage. In April 2001 the company created a US subsidiary under the name NC Interactive (based in Austin, Texas, and would later become NCsoft West) after acquiring Destination Games, headed by Richard Garriott and Robert Garriott. In 2004, NCsoft launched two MMORPGs, Lineage II and City of Heroes.

The company formed NCsoft Europe in July 2004 as a wholly owned subsidiary with its main office in Brighton, England. They brought City of Heroes to several European countries on February 4, 2005, and established Lineage II service for Europe as well.

On April 26, 2005, the company launched Guild Wars, a MMORPG with no subscription model. Expansions followed: Guild Wars Factions, Guild Wars Nightfall and Guild Wars Eye of the North. On April 24, 2009, NCsoft announced that Guild Wars had sold more than six million units. On August 28, 2012, NCSOFT launched Guild Wars 2.

On September 10, 2008, NCsoft announced the formation of NCsoft West, a subsidiary which manages NCsoft’s other western organizations, and established its headquarters for that subsidiary in Seattle, Washington.

On July 8, 2011, NCsoft started talks with SK Telecom to acquire Ntreev Soft Co., LtdThe talks were expected to last less than a month, but it took seven for NCsoft to complete the acquisition; purchasing 76% of Ntreev’s stock for ₩108 billion (US$96.7 million) on February 15, 2012.

In 2011, NCsoft purchased Hotdog Studio, a mobile game studio based in Seoul that produces phone and smartphone titles such as Dark Shrine

AMD Radeon RX 460

Like the GTX 1050 and 1050 Ti from Nvidia, the latest in AMD’s Polaris catalog runs cheap, thanks to various takes on the Radeon RX 460 by XFX, Powercolor and others. The RX 460 proper is quite possibly the most affordable means of 1080p gaming outside of integrated CPU graphics. So long as you’re not looking to run The Witcher 3 at 60 fps on Ultra settings, the Radeon RX 460 is a capable, energy efficient piece of kit. Plus, by compromising on memory, it’s able to draw all its power straight from the motherboard, negating the need for any 6- or 8-pin connectors.

GTX 1080

If you want a proper foray into 4K gaming, you’re looking at it. With the launch of Nvidia’s Pascal architecture, you can get the performance of two 980 Ti’s for a fraction of what you’d spend on a Titan X. You might have to turn down the graphics settings in certain games to keep a steady frame rate, but overall, the GTX 1080 finally makes the legendary, native resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 pixels an affordable reality. No longer do you need to strap two cards together in an SLI configuration to experience the latest PC games the way they were meant to be played; the GTX 1080 does 4K with just one.

Unreal Engine

The Unreal Engine is a game engine developed by Epic Games, first showcased in the 1998 first-person shooter game Unreal. Although primarily developed for first-person shooters, it has been successfully used in a variety of other genres, including stealth, MMORPGs, and other RPGs. With its code written in C++, the Unreal Engine features a high degree of portability and is a tool used by many game developers today

On August 17, 2005, Mark Rein, the vice-president of Epic Games, revealed that Unreal Engine 4 had been in development since 2003.[68] Until mid-2008, development was exclusively done by Tim Sweeney, CEO and founder of Epic Games.[69] The engine targets the eighth generation of consoles, PCs and Tegra K1-based devices running Android announced in January 2014 at CES.

In February 2012, Mark Rein said “people are going to be shocked later this year when they see Unreal Engine 4”.Unreal Engine 4 was unveiled to limited attendees at the 2012 Game Developers Conference,[72] and video of the engine being demonstrated by technical artist Alan “Talisman” Willard was released to the public on June 7, 2012 via GameTrailers TV.[73][74] This demo was created on a PC with triple GeForce GTX 580 (tri SLI) and can be run on a PC with a GeForce GTX 680.[75]

One of the major features planned for UE4 was real-time global illumination using voxel cone tracing, eliminating pre-computed lighting. However, this feature has been replaced with a similar but less computationally-expensive algorithm prior to release for all platforms including the PC because of performance concerns on next-generation consoles. UE4 also includes new developer features to reduce iteration time, and allows updating of C++ code while the engine is running. The new “Blueprint” visual scripting system (a successor to UE3’s “Kismet”) allows for rapid development of game logic without using C++, and includes live debugging. The result is reduced iteration time, and less of a divide between technical artists, designers, and programmers.

Contruct 2

Construct is an HTML5-based 2D game editor, developed by Scirra Ltd.[4][5] It is aimed primarily at non-programmers,[6] allowing quick creation of games in a drag-and-drop fashion using a visual editor and a behavior-based logic system.

The primary method of programming games and applications in Construct is through ‘event sheets’, which are similar to source files used in programming languages. Each event sheet has a list of events, which contain conditional statements or triggers. Once these are met, actions or functions can be carried out.[7] Event logic such as OR and AND, as well as sub-events (representing scope) allow for sophisticated systems to be programmed without learning a comparatively more difficult programming language.Groups can be used to enable and disable multiple events at once, and to organize events.