AMD RADEON R9 FURY X

The R9 Fury X uses a brand-new GPU dubbed Fiji, but it’s based on the Graphics Core Next architecture that’s been inside AMD chips since 2011. The numbers have grown in virtually every department, but the structure remains the same: a single Graphics Command Processor delegates tasks to four shader engines, each of which is crammed with 16 compute units.

Every one of those compute units has 64 stream processors, which means each shader engine has 1,024 stream processors; the entire GPU boasts 4,096 of these crucial components.

That’s a big difference from AMD’s previous flagship – and the Fury’s current competition. The R9 290X and Nvidia GeForce GTX 980 Ti both make do with 2,816 stream processors, and the AMD card used only 11 compute units in each Shader Engine, rather than 16.

Valve Corporation

Valve Corporation (commonly referred to as Valve) is an American video game developer and digital distribution company headquartered in Bellevue, Washington. The company is known for the Half-Life, Counter-Strike, Portal, Day of Defeat, Team Fortress, and Left 4 Dead series, Dota 2, and its software distribution platform Steam.

After the success of Half-Life, the team worked on mods, spin-offs, and sequels, including Half-Life 2. All current Valve games are built on its Source engine. The company has developed six game series: Half-Life, Team Fortress, Portal, Counter-Strike, Left 4 Dead and Day of Defeat. Valve is noted for its support of its games’ modding community, most prominently, Counter-Strike, Team Fortress, and Day of Defeat. Valve has branched out with this tradition to continue developing Dota 2 as the standalone sequel to the Warcraft III mod.Each of these games began as a third-party mod that Valve purchased and developed into a full game. They also distribute community mods on Steam.Valve announced the Source 2 engine in March 2015, later porting the entirety of Dota 2 to the engine in September of that year

Cancelled games

Incomplete games include a fairy-themed role-playing gameProspero and Stars of Blood.

Valve worked with Arkane Studios on The Crossing, which was canceled in May 2009. Arkane later tried to produce Return to Ravenholm (a.k.a. Half-Life 2: Episode Four) without consensus by Valve, which was then also canceled

Asus ROG Strix GTX 1050 Ti

With so many lucrative successes this generation, we were admittedly disappointed to see the latest addition to the Pascal family almost completely miss the mark. As indicated in our review benchmarks, the Asus ROG Strix GTX 1050 Ti in particular is an overclocker with the 1080p gaming capabilities you might be in dire need of if you haven’t upgraded your graphics card in a few years. Otherwise, you’re better off saving for a 3GB GTX 1060 instead.

Game Maker Studio

Originally titled Animo, the program was first released in 1999,[2] and began as a program for creating 2D animations. The name was later changed to GameMaker, lacking a space to avoid intellectual property conflicts with the 1991 software Game-Maker.[3]GameMaker primarily runs games that use 2D graphics, allowing the use of limited 3D graphics.[4]

GameMaker is designed to allow its users to easily develop video games without having to learn a complex programming language such as C++ or Java through its proprietary drag and drop system.[5][6] These icons represent actions that would occur in a game, such as movement, basic drawing, and simple control structures. It is also possible to create custom “action libraries” using the Library Maker. Game Maker Language (GML) is the primary interpreted scripting language used in GameMaker, which is usually significantly slower than compiled languages such as C++ or Delphi.[7] It is used to further enhance and control the design of a game through more conventional programming, as opposed to the drag and drop system.

GameMaker accommodates redistribution on multiple platforms.[8] The program builds for these platforms: Windows, Windows 8, Mac OS X, Ubuntu, HTML5, Android, iOS, Windows Phone 8, Tizen, Xbox One, and Playstation.[9][10] However, a Windows desktop computer with system requirements equal to that of the game produced is required in order to develop the games along with a broadband internet connection.[11]

Controversy

Unity Game Engine

With an emphasis on portability, the engine targets the following APIs: Direct3D on Windows and Xbox 360; OpenGL on Mac, Linux, and Windows; OpenGL ES on Android and iOS; and proprietary APIs on video game consoles. Unity allows specification of texture compression and resolution settings for each platform that the game engine supports,[6] and provides support for bump mapping, reflection mapping, parallax mapping, screen space ambient occlusion (SSAO), dynamic shadows using shadow maps, render-to-texture and full-screen post-processing effects.[10] Unity’s graphics engine’s platform diversity can provide a shader with multiple variants and a declarative fallback specification, allowing Unity to detect the best variant for the current video hardware and, if none are compatible, to fall back to an alternative shader that may sacrifice features for performance.[11]

Unity is notable for its ability to target games to multiple platforms. Within a project, developers have control over delivery to mobile devices, web browsers, desktops, and consoles.[6][12] Supported platforms include Android, Apple TV,[13] BlackBerry 10, iOS, Linux, Nintendo 3DS line,[14][15][16] macOS, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Unity Web Player (including Facebook[17]), Wii, Wii U, Windows Phone 8, Windows, Xbox 360, and Xbox One. It includes an asset server and Nvidia’s PhysX physics engine. Unity Web Player is a browser plugin that is supported in Windows and OS X only,[18] which has been deprecated in favor of WebGL.[3] Unity is the default software development kit (SDK) for Nintendo’s Wii U video game console platform, with a free copy included by Nintendo with each Wii U developer license. Unity Technologies calls this bundling of a third-party SDK an “industry first”