AMD RADEON R9 FURY X

The R9 Fury X uses a brand-new GPU dubbed Fiji, but it’s based on the Graphics Core Next architecture that’s been inside AMD chips since 2011. The numbers have grown in virtually every department, but the structure remains the same: a single Graphics Command Processor delegates tasks to four shader engines, each of which is crammed with 16 compute units.

Every one of those compute units has 64 stream processors, which means each shader engine has 1,024 stream processors; the entire GPU boasts 4,096 of these crucial components.

That’s a big difference from AMD’s previous flagship – and the Fury’s current competition. The R9 290X and Nvidia GeForce GTX 980 Ti both make do with 2,816 stream processors, and the AMD card used only 11 compute units in each Shader Engine, rather than 16.

Asus ROG Strix GTX 1050 Ti

With so many lucrative successes this generation, we were admittedly disappointed to see the latest addition to the Pascal family almost completely miss the mark. As indicated in our review benchmarks, the Asus ROG Strix GTX 1050 Ti in particular is an overclocker with the 1080p gaming capabilities you might be in dire need of if you haven’t upgraded your graphics card in a few years. Otherwise, you’re better off saving for a 3GB GTX 1060 instead.

AMD Radeon RX 460

Like the GTX 1050 and 1050 Ti from Nvidia, the latest in AMD’s Polaris catalog runs cheap, thanks to various takes on the Radeon RX 460 by XFX, Powercolor and others. The RX 460 proper is quite possibly the most affordable means of 1080p gaming outside of integrated CPU graphics. So long as you’re not looking to run The Witcher 3 at 60 fps on Ultra settings, the Radeon RX 460 is a capable, energy efficient piece of kit. Plus, by compromising on memory, it’s able to draw all its power straight from the motherboard, negating the need for any 6- or 8-pin connectors.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060

Though it bears resemblance to the GTX 1070 and 1080, the GTX 1060 draws more parallels to Nvidia’s last-gen GeForce 980. In an attempt to compete with the affordable RX 480, which promises 1080p, VR gaming at an aggressive price point, Nvidia was under pressure to come out with something in the same class. The GTX 1060, a mid-range graphics card with a firm grip on 1080p, or even 1440p graphics to a degree, is just that. Given the ubiquity of full HD displays, the GTX 1060 is an inexpensive middle-ground solution for those in need of an energy-efficient GPU that demolishes in terms of performance.

GTX 1080

If you want a proper foray into 4K gaming, you’re looking at it. With the launch of Nvidia’s Pascal architecture, you can get the performance of two 980 Ti’s for a fraction of what you’d spend on a Titan X. You might have to turn down the graphics settings in certain games to keep a steady frame rate, but overall, the GTX 1080 finally makes the legendary, native resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 pixels an affordable reality. No longer do you need to strap two cards together in an SLI configuration to experience the latest PC games the way they were meant to be played; the GTX 1080 does 4K with just one.